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Torah Attitude: Parashas Acharei/Kedoshim: The never-ending Bar/Bat Mitzvah

Summary

At Mount Sinai, the Jewish people accepted G'd's Supremacy. Now is the time to accept His decrees. Accepting the Divine Supremacy is not a single occurrence. It is a prerequisite for the proper fulfillment of the commandments to accept the yoke of the Heavenly Kingdom. By saying "na'ase venishma", the Jewish people strengthened and renewed their acceptance of the Heavenly Kingdom and the laws that they had been taught. Accepting the Heavenly Kingdom at Mount Sinai did not yet show a total dedication to the word of G'd. The Jewish people are commanded to be different than the nations of the world. The 613 commandments given at Mount Sinai include decrees that are beyond the understanding of the human mind. Throughout the forty years of wandering in the wilderness, there was a continual growth and acceptance of the 613 commandments that were given over by Moses. Teaching young children the importance of education will help them when they grow older to understand the importance of continuing to educate themselves for the rest of their lives.

Supremacy and commandments

In the first of this week's two portions G'd tells Moses to instruct the Jewish people concerning the laws of morality. G'd introduces His instructions with the following words: "I am HASHEM your G'd" (Vayikra 18:2). These words are similar to the words used when the Ten Commandments were given at Mount Sinai (Shemos 20:2). Rashi quotes our sages who explain that the deeper meaning of this is that G'd was telling the Jewish people: "At Mount Sinai you accepted My Supremacy. Now is the time to accept My decrees."

Already accepted?

However this needs clarification. Why do we refer to the revelation at Mount Sinai as the time the Jewish people accepted upon themselves G'd's Supremacy? Did they not already accept G'd as their King after the splitting of the sea? As we say in our evening prayers, "And they willingly accepted upon themselves His Kingdom and they all said in unison, 'Who is like You among the powerful ones, HASHEM' Your children saw Your Supremacy when You split the sea before Moses. 'This is my G'd' they exclaimed, and they said 'G'd shall reign forever.'"

Not single occurrence

It appears that acceptance of the Divine Supremacy is not a single occurrence. Rather, as a person grows in his awareness and understanding of G'd and how He conducts the world, this must lead to a higher level of acceptance of G'd's Supremacy.

Proper appreciation

There is a famous story that illustrates this point. Rabbi Saadia Gaon was once staying with a fellow Jew. His host was not aware that his guest was such a distinguished personality, but treated him with the respect he would accord to any visitor. Before the great Gaon left, the real identity of the guest was brought to the attention of his host. He was terribly embarrassed and begged Rabbi Saadia to forgive him that he had not treated him as fitting such a great personality. The Gaon answered that he had no reason to ask for forgiveness as he had treated him with respect and made him very comfortable. To this the host responded that sure he had treated him well, as was fitting for every one of his guests; however, had he known the true identity of his great visitor, he would have honoured him as would be appropriate for such a great Gaon. As Rabbi Saadia heard these words, it brought him to shiver and he exclaimed: "Master of the Universe, we are daily aware of Your greatness, however every day we realize a little more how great You really are. I beg You, Almighty G'd, please forgive us for our serving you yesterday without the proper appreciation of Your true greatness."

Every day

Similarly, the Talmud (Berachot 13a) explains that we accept upon ourselves the yoke of the Heavenly Kingdom twice a day when we say the first paragraph of Shema. In the second paragraph we accept upon ourselves the yoke of the commandments. The Sfas Emes learns from this that it is a prerequisite for the proper fulfillment of the commandments to accept the yoke of the Heavenly Kingdom. Even if we understand the reasons for a specific commandment, we should aspire to fulfill it, not because it makes sense to us, but because G'd commanded us to do so.

Bar/Bar Mitzvah of the Jewish people

When parents circumcise their newborn son on the eighth day, this represents the child's first introduction to the eternal bond between the Heavenly King and His Holy nation. However, a child needs to be educated and taught to know and appreciate what G'd expects of every Jewish person. When the child comes to the age of Bar/Bat Mitzvah, the child begins adulthood with a renewed acceptance of the commandments it has learned. In the same way, we may consider the bringing of the Pesach offering prior to the exodus from Egypt as the time of birth of the Jewish nation. On the eighth day after bringing the Pesach offering, at the splitting of the Red Sea, the "newborn" Jewish nation expressed its first acceptance of the Heavenly Kingdom, as it was saved miraculously from the Egyptians pursuing them. When the Jewish people came to Mount Sinai, this was, in a sense, the Bar/Bat Mitzvah of the Jewish people. By saying "na'ase venishma", "we will do and we will accept", they strengthened and renewed their acceptance of the Heavenly Kingdom and the laws that they had been taught.

Makes sense

Although there was an acceptance of the Heavenly Kingdom at Mount Sinai, the commitment at that time did not yet show a total dedication to the word of G'd. Each of the Ten Commandments is logical and we can relate to the reasoning behind these commandments. Even the commandment of Shabbos as a day of rest is something not only the Jewish people have accepted, but the gentile world has copied the need to have at least one day of rest on a weekly basis. However, Shabbos is much more than just a day of rest for the body. With it comes the elevation of the spirit that is specifically a Jewish concept. The rest of the Ten Commandments are even more understandable and acceptable to the human mind. Thus it could be claimed that the Jewish people only accepted these laws because it made sense to them.

Be different

On the other hand, in this week's Torah portion, the Jewish people are being commanded to be different than the nations of the world. As it says (Vayikra 18:3), "Do not conduct yourselves in the deeds of the land of Egypt in which you dwelled. And do not conduct yourselves in the deeds of the land of Canaan where you are going to; and do not follow their customs." The Jewish people had left Egypt and were now headed to the land of Israel. At this point G'd warned them not to follow in the ways of those nations where they had been and with whom they were going to have contact.

Be holy

In the second of this week Torah portions, our destiny is set even higher. As it says (19:2), "You shall be holy because I, HASHEM your G'd, am holy". The Jewish people, who by now had reached a more mature state, were expected to elevate every detail of their conduct above that of the other nations of the world. Although they had been given all 613 commandments at Mount Sinai in one form or another, G'd gave them the details of these laws throughout their journey in the desert through Moses. Many of the laws were decrees that are beyond the understanding of the human mind, such as the dietary laws, and the prohibition against wearing garments with a mixture of wool and linen. Only someone who has reached a high level of complete acceptance of the Heavenly Kingdom is able to accept these commandments.

Starting point

Every individual has a personal starting point in life. And no one is expected in one instant to fulfill every commandment with all details. On a national level, the Jewish people's starting point was the Pesach offering prior to the exodus from Egypt. Their first acceptance took place at the splitting of the sea. Soon after that their declaration followed at Mount Sinai where they expressed an unconditional acceptance of the commandments. Throughout the forty years of wandering in the wilderness, there was a continual growth accompanied by an acceptance of the 613 commandments as they were given over by Moses.

Never-ending growth

This shows the way for every individual. Whether our starting point is eight days old at the time of circumcision, or at a later mature point, when we realize the need to accept the Heavenly Kingdom, it should always be a never-ending path of gradual growth.

Continuing education

Most parents want their children to have some kind of Jewish education in preparation for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah. Nothing is more important to insure that the children will be part of the Jewish people as they grow up. However, it is equally important to continue this education. As King Solomon says (Mishlei 22:6), "Educate the young one on his way so that when he gets older he will not depart from it." The founder of the Mussar Movement, Rabbi Israel Salanter, explains this verse in the following way. Parents and educators must constantly impress upon their children and students the importance of education and continuous growth and development. In this way they will continue as they get older to grow and educate themselves for the rest of their lives.

These words were based on a talk given by Rabbi Avraham Kahn, the Rosh Yeshiva and Founder of Yeshivas Keser Torah in Toronto.


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